Communication

Communication

Communication in all its various forms is the way people interact and relate with their world.

People with cerebral palsy may experience difficulties with communication in areas such as speech, the development of gesture and facial expression, receptive and expressive language and voice production. Learning to communicate with others, and ensuring that you’re understood in return, is a vital part of every child’s early development. 

Speech language pathologists and therapists can make assessments and put together recommendations. For those with more severe oral motor impairments assistive or augmentative communication and technologies can help. 

Contributors
Dr. Howard Shane, PhD
Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement Boston Children’s Hospital Harvard Medical School
Dr. Ted Conway, PhD
Professor & Head Department of Biomedical Engineering Florida Institute of Technology
Elizabeth Rose, MA, CCC-SLP
Speech-Language Pathologist, Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement, Boston Children's Hospital
Karen Janowski, MSEd
Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Education, Simmons College; Assistive Technology Consultant, EdTech Solutions

Learning to communicate with others, and ensuring that you’re understood in return, is a vital part of life