Healthcare

Early Detection & Intervention Network

WE ARE IMPLEMENTING WAYS TO RECOGNIZE CP EARLIER

Cerebral palsy is caused by damage to developing brain, either during pregnancy or shortly before birth. However, diagnosis is often delayed until after a child is 24 months old, losing valuable treatment time. Our goal is to lower the age when CP is recognized to help the youngest children benefit from the best evidence- based interventions early in life, when long-term benefits are highest.

A total of 6 sites are currently included in the CPF Early Detection Network (Nationwide Children’s Hospital , Kennedy Krieger Institute, UCLA Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Utah and Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago). The purpose of this project is to create a scalable approach to system wide practice change resulting in earlier diagnosis and treatment of cerebral palsy. In 12 months our network was able to decrease the age of detection from 19 months to an average of 9.5 months across the network.

Women's Health Initiative

WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES FACE MANY CHALLENGES. FINDING ADEQUATE BASIC HEALTHCARE SHOULDN’T BE ONE OF THEM. SO CPF CREATED THE WOMEN’S HEALTH INITIATIVE. THIS PROJECT IS GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY 100 WOMEN IN HEDGE FUNDS.

CPF and a collaborative network of nationally renowned medical institutions have joined together not only to identify the barriers to better healthcare, but also begin to develop and implement new approaches. This effort began with the generous support of 100 Women in Hedge Funds, one of the nation’s leading philanthropic organizations. Their fundraising efforts have raised nearly $2M for our foundation.

Each of our four partnering institutions is addressing a different aspect of healthcare for women, as we work with them and real women with disabilities to weave their findings together and put forth a comprehensive plan.

  • The Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center at Columbia University Medical Center will investigate gynecological needs and service barriers for women with CP.
  • The Complex Care Service at Harvard’s Boston Children’s Hospital will focus on sexual and reproductive health among adolescents with CP.
  • The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University will promote patient-centered care in mammography.
  • The Center for Cerebral Palsy at the UCLA Medical Center will seek to improve reproductive life planning and obstetrical care for women with CP who wish to become pregnant and start a family.